Behind the Scenes


    Check back here for current legislation, administrative activity, quality topics and public relations.

    Legislation/Advocacy

    Part of the efforts of MMHD Administration focuses on staying current with legislation that affects healthcare. Administrative staff is involved in a variety of committees and organizations on the local, county, state and national level. Click the above title for current information, bills we are watching and more.

    What can you do? BE INFORMED, ASK QUESTIONS, CONTACT YOUR LEGISLATORS. MMHD will often have sample letter templates posted on the website. To learn more about an issue, get a sample letter or information on who to contact, please call or email Valerie Lakey.

    California Legislators

    The Legislative Process

    Letter Writing and Advocacy

    As a part of our Advocacy plan at MMHD, we often write letters regarding legislation affecting healthcare. It is important for our voice to be heard. We work with th California Hospital Association, The Association of California Healthcare Districts and more to advocate our cause.

    Sample Letter 1

    Sample Letter 2

    Our California Representatives

    Assemblyman Brian Dahle - Assembly District 1

    Senator Ted Gaines - Senate District 1

    Public Relations

    Community Outreach, Facility Collaboration, Patient Relations (Coming Soon)



    Valerie Lakey
    Director of Public Relations/Legislation
    (530) 336-5511 Ext. 1136
    vlakey@mayersmemorial.com

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    In 1949 a Chamber of Commerce hospital committee was formed and began taking the first steps toward a visionary project -Ward Memorial Hospital. The Chamber's "Hospital Committee" compiled the costs of building a new hospital to present to taxpayers -the first hospital bond issue was defeated in 1950. If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. After one private hospital discontinued practice due to inadequate facilities, leaving only one that could handle just 23 patients, the need for a county hospital was again fronted to the citizens in 1953. With the support of local doctors, civic groups and women's clubs, a bond election was called in March of 1954. In June of 1954 the voters voted six-to-one in favor of a county hospital.